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Tuesday, June 26, 2007 (read 2594 times)
 

Who is the most important Spaniard in history?

by Erin

King Juan Carlos, according to the 3000 Spaniards who participated in a television show called "The Spaniard of History" in May of 2007.

Miguel de Cervantes and Christopher Columbus (why, yes, in fact he was Italian, but apparently Spanish employees count), finished in 2nd and 3rd place, well behind King Juan Carlos.

Those voting for the King cited his "decisive role in the transition and in the attempted military coup of Febuary 23, 1981, known as 23-F in Spain." Just a week ago Spain celebrated the 30th anniversary of the first Voting Day of the new democratic Spain - a key moment in the transition to democracy led by King Juan Carlos after the death of Franco.

While the King was the overall winner, the results varied by age. The King won hands-down amongst Spaniards between the ages of 44 and 60, while voters under put Cervantes in first place, and the 31-to-43 year old group chose Christopher Columbus.

The overall top 10 also included Adolfo Suárez, elected president of the newly democratic government in that first election 30 years ago, Pablo Picasso and Santa Teresa de ávila. Interestingly enough, Franco landed in 23rd place, not a finish he'd like, I suspect.

I've linked to the Spanish language wikipedia pages for each of the (linked) winners mentioned. Just a subtle suggestion to get reading in Spanish; you could always click over to the English version, but why would you want to?

So who do you think was the most important Spaniard of history, from an outsider's view?


Keywords: spanish,news,culture

Comments

1 » Erin (on Monday, July 16, 2007) said:

Yep, boulder, I think you're on to something. There was quite a battle over whether the remains in the Cathedral in Sevilla really were his, for example. And there were front page headlines recently when DNA testing supposedly proved it was indeed Cristobal Colón (or some part of him…) in the tomb in Sevilla.

2 » Boulder Tutor

I'd say Columbus was an honary Spaniard. Like Harvard gives out honary degrees.

3 » Erin (on Monday, July 16, 2007) said:

Yep, boulder, I think you're on to something. There was quite a battle over whether the remains in the Cathedral in Sevilla really were his, for example. And there were front page headlines recently when DNA testing supposedly proved it was indeed Cristobal Colón (or some part of him…) in the tomb in Sevilla.

4 » Boulder Tutor

I'd say Columbus was an honary Spaniard. Like Harvard gives out honary degrees.

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